20 Tips to Help you Drink more Water

20 Tips to Help you Drink more Water by Life Water Ionizers

You can’t count on your body to tell you when it’s thirsty if you are middle-aged (50+) or older. Your body’s thirst mechanism doesn’t work as well as it did when you are young. Your body may misinterpret thirst for hunger, making you eat when what you really need to do is drink more water! To keep yourself properly hydrated, it will take some effort on your part. Here are 20 tips that will help you drink more water.

20 Tips to Help you Drink more Water

If you’re aged 50 or older, you can’t count on thirst to tell you when to drink more water

Find out how much water you need to drink

The first step towards drinking more water is knowing how much you should drink. As a general rule, according to the Mayo Clinic, men should drink 3 liters per day and women should drink 2.2 liters per day.

A more accurate way to find out how much water you should be drinking uses your body weight. If your body weight is above or below average, that will have an effect:

  1. Divide your body in pounds weight by two
  2. The result is the number of ounces of water you should be drinking

For example: I weigh 138 pounds. Divide that by two and you get 69. Convert that into ounces, and you get 69 ounces. Sixty-nine ounces is just over two liters. The Mayo Clinic recommendation suggests that as a male, I should be drinking three liters. So why the difference? I’m close to 30 pounds underweight!

You should increase the amount of water you drink if you exercise. My actual water consumption per day is closer to the three liters recommended by the Mayo Clinic for men because I ride my bike to work here at Life Ionizers. It’s a 20-mile round trip, so I need the extra water to stay properly hydrated. Drink about a half liter (16 ounces) of water per hour you are working out.

Rise and shine!

Start your day by drinking a 16-ounce glass of water. Drinking water when you first wake up encourages peristalsis: The movement of food and wastes through your intestines. It also replaces the water that your body lost while you were sleeping.

Keep score

Now that you know how much water you should be drinking, you should track your progress towards your goal during the day. A great way to do this is to buy a bottle that can hold all of the water you need to drink in a day.

Set reminders

Put post-it notes reminding you to drink more water in plain sight. Set an alarm to remind yourself to get a glass of water every hour. If you drink an eight-ounce glass of water every hour, you will easily reach your goal by the end of the day.

Get a drinking water system

You can get a filter pitcher, a kitchen sink filter, or even a water ionizer. Your system will save you money over the cost of bottled water, and serve as a handy reminder to you of your commitment to better hydration.

Pee clear

One way to make sure you stay well hydrated is to monitor the color of your pee when you go, if it’s clear, you are well hydrated. If it’s dark yellow, you’re dehydrated and need to drink more water.  Light yellow could mean you probably took some B Vitamins earlier.

Replace the water you lose

Drink an eight-ounce glass of water every time you go to the bathroom. By doing this, you’re making sure you never fall behind.

Take it to go

Carry a water bottle with you at all times. This is especially helpful if you are keeping track of how much you’re drinking.

Exercise requires more water

When you work out, plan to drink 16 ounces of water for every hour you work out. If you are working out for more than an hour, you also need to replace electrolytes. Gatorade is a popular electrolyte replacement beverage, but there are others as well that don’t contain as much sugar as Gatorade.

Drink a glass before bed

This could save your life. An eight-ounce glass of water about an hour before bed can prevent a heart attack or stroke. Your body loses water while you sleep, which can cause your blood to become thicker, which makes it harder for your heart to pump. Research shows conclusively that a glass of water before bed cuts your risk of heart attack and stroke.

Replace other beverages with water

Keep track of how many different beverages you consume, and which kinds. Start by replacing the worst – soda, diet soda – with water. Coffee and tea do contribute to your overall hydration, so you don’t need to replace them. But drinking soda has been shown to be very harmful to your health, so make it a top priority to replace soda in your diet.

Drink when you are hungry

Your body may be mistaking thirst for hunger. The best way to find out it to drink a glass of water anytime you feel hungry. Research shows that for people 50+ years of age, drinking a glass of water when hungry significantly reduce snacking and calorie intake during meals. You simply don’t feel as hungry, so you eat less.

Drink before you eat

Have a glass of water an hour, and then again a half hour before every meal. Just like when you feel hungry between meals, drinking water before meals reduces your calorie intake.

Eat your water

Put some added health and taste in your water by adding fruits. You will get the benefit of the healthy nutrients in fruit, plus hydration.

Alkaline water triples the antioxidant potential of vitamin C Alkaline water has benefits that plain water doesn’t: It triples the antioxidant potential of the vitamin C in citrus fruits, and reduces the acidity of citrus fruit juice beverages. reducing the acidity of fruit juices makes drinking them easier on your digestive system.

Always drink water when drinking alcohol

Alcoholic beverages dehydrate you, which will lead to a hangover if you drink a lot! You can remain hydrated, and significantly reduce your chances of having a hangover if you drink water while you’re drinking alcoholic beverages. Try alternating alcohol with water: Have an alcoholic beverage, then drink a glass of water. When you wake up in the morning, you’ll be glad you did!

Did you know? Alkaline water has been shown to protect the liver from the damaging effects of alcohol. Drinking it may even help prevent a hangover!

Make your water taste better

Alkaline water tastes from a water ionizer better than plain water – it’s sweeter, and feels a lot more refreshing. This is a fact that has been confirmed in double-blinded taste testing. Once you try alkaline water, you will prefer it’s taste to any other kind of water. In fact, Life Ionizers guarantees we will make your water into the best-tasting water you ever drank.

Drink other beverages that hydrate you

Coffee – America’s favorite antioxidant beverage, and Tea both contribute hydration, so your coffee and tea consumption counts!

Make your coffee and tea flavorful and healthier with alkaline water. Brewing coffee and tea with alkaline water provides two huge benefits. It enhances their antioxidant potential, and makes them taste better. If you are a coffee connoisseur, as I am, you will really appreciate what alkaline water does for the taste of your coffee.

Drink like a diva!

Be like Beyonce, and drink your water through a straw. Using a straw causes you to take bigger gulps, so you drink more. You don’t have to use a titanium straw as Beyonce does, but try to avoid disposable straws which are bad for the environment, and can leach chemicals into the water you are drinking.

Involve others

Make yourself accountable to a friend or coworker, and them accountable to you. Set up a reward/penalty system that you both agree to and hold each other accountable. This can also make drinking water an ice-breaking social activity that could increase your circle of friends.

Headache, constipation, lack energy? Drink water!

Studies show that all three of those conditions can be caused by dehydration. Make it a point to reach for a glass of water anytime you feel tired during the day. Got a headache, down a glass of water. Constipated? Drink a lot of water, try two, 16-ounce glasses of water. That will stimulate peristalsis – the movement of wastes through your intestines. That may be all you need to clear the blockage, and feel better.

How a water ionizer makes your water better

Imagine a health supplement that supplies: Nutrition, hydration, acid-fighting alkalinity, and healthy antioxidant potential – all in one! There is such a health supplement and it’s alkaline water! When made by a water ionizer, alkaline water supplies:

  • Nutrition – Calcium, magnesium and other minerals in the form of easy-to-absorb mineral hydrates
  • Hydration – Alkaline water has been shown to hydrate 17% better than regular water in studies conducted at the University of Montana and elsewhere.
  • Acid-fighting alkalinity – Alkaline water has been shown to neutralize pepsin – the enzyme that triggers GERD, and to buffer hydrochloric acid. It reduces the acid-load on your body
  • Antioxidant potential – When made by a water ionizer, alkaline water has antioxidant potential that has been shown to neutralize harmful Reactive Oxygen Species, and it triples the antioxidant potential of vitamin C!

Best of all, with a water ionizer, you will never run out of alkaline water. Forget having to run out to the store, figure out what to do with all those empty plastic bottles. Your fountain of youth is as close as your kitchen sink.

 

Discover how alkaline water can help you take back your health. Call us at 855 419-2840 for a free, no obligation healthy water consultation

 

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