You can drink too much of any kind of water. Overconsumption of water causes hyponatremia, a serious

can-you-drink-too-much-alkaline-water

You can’t over-alkalize with alkaline water.

condition. But you have to drink a lot of water to risk hyponatremia. A better question could be: Can you become too alkaline by drinking alkaline water? The answer is no, because your body tightly regulates its pH levels. The condition of becoming too alkaline, called alkalosis, can only be caused by consuming too much of something that is highly alkaline, like baking soda.

Did you know? The condition of becoming too alkaline, called alkalosis, is extremely rare. But the condition of becoming too acidic, called acidosis is extremely common. That’s why alkaline water is good for your health: Your body needs the alkalinity.

Why you can’t over alkalize with alkaline water

Alkaline water only contains small amounts of alkalis. The alkalis in alkaline water are primarily calcium hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide. These beneficial mineral hydrates are typically present at no more than 200 milligrams per liter – which in solid form would be less than a quarter of a teaspoon. In a normal day, you only  need to drink 2 – 3 liters of alkaline water per day, so it’s simply impossible to over-alkalize on alkaline water.

Better bone health is only a glass away!  Clinical studies show that drinking alkaline water reduces your rate of bone loss, and helps you keep the healthy bone you have. Even the prestigious Mayo Clinic agrees: There is a link between alkaline water and bone health

For good health, you only need to get a tiny amount of calcium and magnesium from your water, it’s why alkaline water is so good for your health. The World Health Organization recommends that you get 10 – 20% of your daily needs for calcium and magnesium from the water you drink.

Daily need for calcium and magnesium:

  • Calcium – 1,200 milligrams
  • Magnesium – 320 milligrams per day

 

Alkaline water always contains more calcium than it does magnesium. This is because calcium is present in far greater quantities in the earth’s crust than magnesium. So alkaline water comes with the perfect balance of calcium and magnesium for good health.

Daily need for calcium and magnesium from water:

  • Calcium – 120 to 240 milligrams
  • Magnesium – 32 to 64 milligrams

 

By drinking 2 – 3 liters of alkaline water per day, you’ll get the WHO recommended amounts of calcium and magnesium from water, and you can’t overdo it!

Symptoms of hyponatremia

Overhydration can be caused by drinking too much water too quickly, or it can be caused by some medical conditions that interfere with the body’s ability to expel water. The symptoms of hyponatremia look a lot like heatstroke:

  • You may feel hot
  • Have a headache
  • Feel sick
  • Can also be accompanied by diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting

 

Because the symptoms of hyponatremia look like heatstroke, you should ask a person with the above symptoms if they drank a lot of water recently. If they answer yes, then get medical attention right away. Hyponatremia can lead to:

  • Swelling in the brain
  • Seizures
  • Coma

 

The best way to prevent hyponatremia is to not drink more than you sweat out. It’s hard to measure how much you’ve sweated out. An easier way is to simply moderate your consumption of water: For example, a gallon in an hour would be too much. Professional athletes manage their hydration, you should too.

How much alkaline water should you drink?

The most accurate method for determining how much water you should drink is based on body weight. Here’s the math:

  1. Divide your weight in pounds by two
  2. The result you get is the amount of water in ounces that you need to drink daily

 

For example: If you weigh 170 Lbs, you would want to drink 85 ounces of water per day. You should increase your water intake on hot days, and days where you exercise vigorously. Add 16 ounces of water per hour of vigorous exercise. For hot days, listen to your body and drink when thirsty. By following these simple rules, you’ll never have to worry about drinking too much alkaline water (or any kind of water for that matter).

Why you can’t drink too much alkaline water

Alkaline water hydrates better than plain water. By drinking alkaline water for your recommended daily intake, you’ll give your body the mineral nutrition from water it needs, and improve your hydration status, which could:

  • Prevent a heart attack or stroke
  • Give you more energy
  • Help you lose weight
  • Reduce depression and anxiety

 

The Centers for Disease Control estimates that 3 out of 4 people are chronically dehydrated. Chronic dehydration is linked to the development of many diseases. By drinking alkaline water, you’ll be providing your body with two important health benefits: Acid-fighting alkalinity and better hydration. These benefits could make all the difference in your health.

 

We can help you make healthy choices about water. Call us at 877-959-7977 for a free consultation.

 

References

 

Ostojic, Sergej, and Marko Stonanovic. “Hydrogen-Rich Water Affected Blood Alkalinity in Physically Active Men.” . Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal, 06 Jan 2014. Web. 20 Feb 2014. <http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15438627.2013.852092>.

 

Wynn, E, MA Krieg, JM Aeschlimann, and P Burckhardt. “Alkaline mineral water lowers

bone resorption even in calcium sufficiency: alkaline mineral water and bone metabolism.” Bone. Elsevier, 27 Oct 2008. Web. 1 Jul 2013. <http://www.thebonejournal.com/article/S8756-3282(08)00781-3/abstract>.

 

Burckhardt, Peter. “The Effect of the Alkali Load of Mineral Water on Bone Metabolism.”

The Journal of Nutrition. American Society for Nutrition, n.d. Web. 26 Mar 2014. <http://jn.nutrition.org/content/138/2/435S.long>.

 

Rylander, Ragnar, and Maurice Arnaud. “Mineral water intake reduces blood pressure

among subjects with low urinary magnesium and calcium levels.” BMC Public Health. BMC Public Health, 30 Nov 2004. Web. 1 Jul 2013. <http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/4/56>.

 

Abraham, Guy, and Jorge Flebas. “The effect of daily consumption of 2 liters of

electrolyzed water for 2 months on body composition and several physiological parameters in four obese subjects: a preliminary report.” Highbeam Research. Original Internist, 01 Sep 2011. Web. 2 Jul 2013. <http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-269433201.html>.

 

Ericson, John. ” 75% of Americans May Suffer From Chronic Dehydration, According to

Doctors.”Medical Daily. Medical Daily, 03 Jul 2013. Web. 15 Nov 2013. <http://www.medicaldaily.com/75-americans-may-suffer-chronic-dehydration-according-doctors-247393>.

 

Heil, P and Seifert, J. Influence of bottled water on rehydration following a dehydrating bout of cycling exercise. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition  Springerlink July 2009. http://www.springerlink.com/content/kn41764j65165u3x/fulltext.pdf

 

Heil, D. “Acid-base balance and hydration status following consumption of mineral-based alkaline bottled water..” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 13 Sep 2010. Web. 26 Mar 2014. <http://www.jissn.com/content/7/1/29>

 

World Health Organization, . “Nutrients in Drinking Water .” WHO | Nutrients in drinking water. World Health Organization, n.d. Web. 5 Jul 2013. <http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/nutrientsbegin.pdf>.
Gumashta, J, R Gumashta, and et al. “Hard water and heart: the story revisited.” IOSR Journal of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences. IOSR Journal of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences, n.d. Web. 5 Jul 2013. <http://iosrjournals.org/iosr-jpbs/papers/vol1-issue1/B0110720.pdf>.