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David Wolfe cries Wolf about Calcification

  • Leo McDevitt
  • April 10th, 2012
david a. wolfe, quack image

David A Wolfe may be harming millions with his “advice”

David Wolfe has been crying wolf over an imagined epidemic of over calcification. He claims that calcium from supplements and water are contributing to aging and disease. If water-borne calcium was harmful, the Okinawa Centenarian study would not exist. Okinawa, Japan is home to one of the largest populations of centenarians – people who live to 100 – in the world. The water drank by the centenarians on Okinawa is calcium-rich alkaline water; it gets its calcium from the coral formations that underlie the island of Okinawa.

What is calcification?

Calcification is caused by calcium deposits in the body, and can result in kidney stones and other problems. What could cause calcification in the body?  Research from the University of Texas shows that low urinary pH is a contributing factor. Urine that is too acidic has a statistical relationship to the symptoms of Metabolic Syndrome: The lower the urine pH (taken over a 24 hour cycle) the more symptoms of metabolic syndrome you are likely to have. One of the symptoms of metabolic syndrome is kidney stones.

Why David Wolf crying Wolf over calcium is Dangerous

Metabolic syndrome has become a public health epidemic, and so has osteoporosis. Research has shown that low urinary pH a common symptom of people with either problem. David Wolfe is correct in urging people to eat healthier, but he is flat out wrong about water-borne calcium. Research has shown that minerals like calcium are 30% easier for the body to absorb from water than it is from food.

David Wolfe vs. the Okinawa Study

David Wolfe is a 41 year old health supplement salesman; the Okinawa Study is based on 900 people from Okinawa, Japan that lived to be at least 100 years old. If you add up the life spans of the centenarians in the Okinawa study, (900 people x 100 years) they have a collective life experience of over 90,000 years; David is just reaching middle age.

The water in Okinawa Japan is coral-calcium rich and has a pH of 10. Based on the 90,000 years of collective life experience of Japan’s centenarians, it’s safe to say that David Wolfe’s claim about water-borne calcium is absurd. Based on studies of alkaline water and bone health, his claim may even be harming people.

Want to learn more about how alkaline water helps you maintain healthy bones? Call our water health experts today at (888) 688-8889

What does the FDA think about David Wolfe?

We don’t know! David Wolfe fled the country when the FDA challenged his claims!

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  The preceding information and/or products are for educational purposes only and are not meant to diagnose, prescribe, or treat illness. Please consult your doctor before making any changes or before starting ANY exercise or nutritional supplement program or before using this information or any product during pregnancy or if you have a serious medical condition.

Reference

Makoto, Suzuki, Bradley Wilcox, and Craig Wilcox. “The Okinawa Centenarian Study.” . The Okinawa Centenarian Study. Web. 9 Jul 2013. <http://www.okicent.org/study.html>.

Marangella, M, C Vitale, and et al. “Effects of mineral composition of drinking water on risk for stone formation and bone metabolism in idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis.” PubMed NCBI. Clinical Science. Web. 9 Jul 2013. <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8869414>.

Wynn, E, M.A. Krieg, J.M. Aeschlimann, and P Burckhardt. “Alkaline mineral water lowers bone resorption even in calcium sufficiency: alkaline mineral water and bone metabolism.” Bone. Elsevier, 27 Oct 2008. Web. 8 Jul 2013. <http://www.thebonejournal.com/article/S8756-3282(08)00781-3/abstract>.

 Maalouf, N, M Cameron, and et al. “Low Urine pH: A Novel Feature of the Metabolic Syndrome.” Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. American Society of Nephrology, 29 May 2007. Web. 9 Jul 2013. <http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/content/2/5/883.full.pdf>.