If you’re ready to work for it, research suggests that you can reduce age-related declines in muscle and

Alkaline Water and High Intensity Training Reduce Age Related Decline

Alkaline water enables you top go harder and get the most from high intensity training

metabolic function by engaging in high intensity interval training. Other research performed mostly on animals shows that drinking alkaline water may also extend life and that it definitely reduces the intracellular oxidation that occurs during high intensity interval training. Taken together, alkaline water and high intensity interval training, along with a healthy diet, have the potential to keep you healthy and vital for years to come.

Energy: The benefit of high intensity interval training

It’s well known that exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle that helps reduce your chances of developing age-related diseases. Medical research has shown that even light to moderate exercise has health benefits. But now, a recently released study suggests that the best form of exercise for fighting aging may be high intensity interval training. Research shows that it significantly increases energy production in cell mitochondria in young and older people alike. The cell mitochondria are where your body generates all of its energy, so by improving the production of energy in your cell mitochondria, you get more energy.

High-intensity aerobic interval training (HIIT) consists of repeated short bouts of activity at maximum intensity. This kind of training is part of many popular fitness regimes such as high intensity aerobics, spin training, martial arts, and others. Any aerobic exercise that is done in short bursts at maximum intensity is high intensity interval aerobic training. While light to moderate exercise is beneficial for your health, it doesn’t provide as much benefit as high intensity aerobic interval training. Bottom line, if you want the maximum age-related benefit from exercise, you have to work for it.

Alkaline water’s age defying potential

life-ionizer-reviews-shawne-merrimanResearch on alkaline water’s potential as an anti-aging treatment has been conducted in laboratory testing, and in model organisms: Animals that have physiology similar to ours, so they serve as a useful starting point for testing potential new treatments. What scientists have found is that alkaline water significantly reduces the accumulation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) which is a type of harmful radical that is a factor in accelerated aging and the development of disease.

Alkaline water’s for anti-aging has been studied in Caenorhabditis elegans, a type of worm, and in mice. In the Caenorhabditis elegans studies, it was found that alkaline water extended the worm’s lifespans by 11 to 41%. In mice, it was found that mice given alkaline water lived for up to a year longer than mice that drank plain water. Since mice normally live no more than 2 years, an additional year of life represents a 33% extension of life. No human trials have been conducted yet, and there needs to be human trials to confirm the results of the animal research. But even though the results of alkaline water anti aging research are preliminary, those results have been promising enough for alkaline water to be listed in a database of anti aging drugs http://genomics.senescence.info/drugs/browse.php?search=water In that database, alkaline water is referred to by its scientific name: Electrolyzed Reduced Water.

Alkaline water and electrolytes enhance high intensity interval training

When you work out at high intensity, there are three things working against you:

  • Dehydration – Loss of water and electrolytes due to exercise
  • Muscular acidosis – Buildup of lactic acid in the muscles
  • Intracellular oxidation – Accumulation of ROS in the body

 

Dehydration: Your performance begins to drop off with as little as 2% loss of water (by body weight). Alkaline water hydrates better than plain water, so it gives you an extra hydration cushion against performance robbing dehydration.

Mix alkaline water and electrolytes (such as powdered Gatorade), and you can actually increase your athletic performance. Research published in the Serbian Journal of Sports Sciences revealed that alkaline water combined with powdered Gatorade reduced the heart rates and blood lactate levels of runners doing wind sprints, a type of high intensity interval training. The combination of alkaline water and Gatorade also resulted in the athletes perceiving that it took less effort to accomplish the exercise regimen in the study. The combination of alkaline water and Gatorade provided these three benefits to the runners:

  • Increases serum bicarbonate levels
  • Reduced blood lactate levels
  • Reduced perceived rate of exertion

 

Serum bicarbonate levels measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the blood. Carbon dioxide acidifies the blood, which lowers your pH balance and reduces your blood’s ability to carry oxygen to your cells. The higher your serum bicarbonate levels are, the lower the carbon dioxide levels are  in your blood. So higher serum bicarbonate levels indicate a body in the healthy, alkaline state. A body in an alkaline state performs better than a body in a more acidic state.

Blood lactate levels measure the amount of lactic acid in your bloodstream. Lactic acid is produced when your muscles convert glycogen into energy. It causes the painful burning sensation in your muscles. It used to be thought that this burning was beneficial, “no pain, no gain” is how the saying went. We now know that it isn’t helpful to experience that painful burning. The longer you can hold it off, the harder you can train. Reducing blood lactate levels enables you to train harder.

Reduced rate of exertion. The last benefit of mixing alkaline water and electrolytes may be the most interesting: It reduces your perceived level of exertion. This means that it makes you feel like it takes less effort to do your workout. That, in turn encourages you to train harder. The result is that you get better workouts and are able to go for longer and more intense exercise intervals. By reducing your perceived level of exertion, the combination of alkaline water and electrolytes can increase both the intensity and duration of your workout.

Alkaline water alone also benefits workouts

Even without adding electrolytes, alkaline water improves your hydration status and blood pH balance. Research conducted at Montana State University revealed that alkaline water hydrates better than plain water, and that it reduces blood lactate levels. For workouts that last over an hour, it’s best to start with alkaline water mixed with electrolytes. Then once you finish drinking your alkaline water electrolyte beverage, maintain your hydration level with straight alkaline water. You should have one 16 ounce glass of alkaline water and electrolytes for every hour you work out. Finish the hour with straight alkaline water. This way you’ll maintain optimal electrolyte, hydration, and pH levels.

Click here for detailed instructions on how to use alkaline water for sports hydration

Before you start high intensity interval training

Talk to your doctor before you start high intensity interval training. Any kind of athletic training puts strain on the body, your doctor is the only one who knows for sure if a workout plan will be good for your health.

A water ionizer is a must when using alkaline water for sports training. The alkaline water made by a water ionizer has high antioxidant potential, you need that antioxidant potential to reduce intracellular oxidation, and to get the most out of your electrolyte drink mix. The alkaline water you see in stores doesn’t have antioxidant potential, because that antioxidant potential doesn’t keep. It begins to dissipate about 24 hours after you make the alkaline water. So to get the performance benefits mentioned in this article, you must make your alkaline water with a water ionizer

 

Imagine feeling energetic and healthy, you can do it! Call Life Ionizers today at 877-959-7977 and ask about our 75 day trial period. Find out for yourself how good it feels to go alkaline!

 

References

Robinson, Matthew. Dasari Surenda and et al. “Enhanced Protein Translation Underlies

Improved Metabolic and Physical Adaptations to Different Exercise Training Modes in Young and Old Humans” Cell Metabolism. Vol 25, 3. Pg 581-592. 7 March 2017. Web 22 March 2017. http://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(17)30099-2

 

Ostojic, Sergej, and Marko Stonanovic. “Hydrogen-Rich Water Affected Blood Alkalinity

in Physically Active Men.” . Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal, 06 Jan 2014. Web. 20 Feb 2014. <http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15438627.2013.852092>.

 

Ostojic, S.M. “Al. Drinks with alkaline negative oxidative reduction potential improve exercise

performance in physically active men and women: double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial of efficacy and safety..” Serbian Journal of Sports Sciences. 5.3 (2011): 83-89. http://www.sjss-sportsacademy.edu.rs/archive/details/drinks-with-alkaline-negative-oxidative-reduction-potential-improve-exercise-performance-in-physically-active-men-and-women-double-blind-randomized-placebo-controlled-cross-over-trial-of-efficacy-and-safety-223.html

 

Lee, MY, YK Kim, and et al. “Electrolyzed-reduced water protects against oxidative

damage to DNA, RNA, and protein.” Springer Link. Humana Press, 01 Nov 2006. Web. 2 Jul 2013. <http://link.springer.com/article/10.1385/ABAB:135:2:133>.

 

Abraham, Guy, and Jorge Flebas. “The effect of daily consumption of 2 liters of

electrolyzed water for 2 months on body composition and several physiological parameters in four obese subjects: a preliminary report.” Highbeam Research. Original Internist, 01 Sep 2011. Web. 2 Jul 2013. <http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-269433201.html>.

 

Heil, P and Seifert, J. Influence of bottled water on rehydration following a dehydrating bout of

cycling exercise. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition    Springerlink July 2009. http://www.springerlink.com/content/kn41764j65165u3x/fulltext.pdf

 

Heil, D. “Acid-base balance and hydration status following consumption of

mineral-based alkaline bottled water..” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 13 Sep 2010. Web. 26 Mar 2014. <http://www.jissn.com/content/7/1/29>.